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Tipping The Scales Of
Justice In Your Favor

Who pays for your workers’ compensation claim?

| Oct 1, 2019 | Uncategorized |

If you’re like many people, you care about how your employer perceives you. You want them to see you as a professional and reliable employee. Sustaining an injury on the job may leave you conflicted about what to do. You know that you need medical care due to your work-related injury, but you also don’t want to cost your employer and become viewed as a liability.

The worst thing that you can do is delay filing your workers’ compensation claim. Waiting or delaying filing a claim could lead to a fine and/or misdemeanor charge from the New York Workers’ Compensation Board to your employer.

Employers must carry workers compensation insurance

A common misconception and the reason some injured workers fear harming their employer is the belief that the company pays for workers’ compensation. New York state law requires employers to carry workers’ compensation insurance. When you file a claim, it’s your company’s insurance company that pays for your workers’ compensation.

Penalties for non-compliance can be steep, too. If your employer does not have proper coverage, save for any exemptions, they could face fines and a court could order them to compensate you and cover your medical bills.

While an employer does pay their insurance premiums, having insurance is far less expensive than not having it. Your employer would likely prefer that their insurance pay for your claims. The insurance coverage is there for a reason.

Get the compensation and care that you deserve

It’s nice to have concern for the well-being of your employer but carrying workers’ compensation insurance is one step they take to protect themselves from liability if you become injured on the job. By filing your claim within 10 days of the injury, you can have your medical bills covered and keep your employer from thousands of dollars in penalties.

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