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Physicians should pay heed of first time DWIs

| Jul 12, 2019 | Drunk Driving Charges |

Even a DWI first offense can leave a New Yorker facing serious consequences. This is the case even when the person has never had a criminal conviction before. She may even be a well-respected professional, like a doctor who makes her living treating patients with different illnesses and injuries.

Like many others, physicians and other medical may want to enjoy themselves over a few alcoholic drinks from time to time. If as a result they find themselves facing drunk driving charges, whether the charges are well-founded or not, they should strongly consider speaking with an attorney who has experience defending people charged with DWAIs and DWIs.

After all, even when jail is not on the table, the license suspension and other penalties can still present a serious hardship for a physician. Furthermore, a drunk driving conviction can lead to a great deal of professional and personal embarrassment and could even cause problems at work.

Perhaps more importantly, a criminal conviction for drunk driving can be considered unprofessional conduct in several respects. In practice, this means state authorities can impose further consequences on a physician over and beyond the criminal conviction.

In the most serious case, a doctor could even lose his license to practice medicine or have his license suspended for some time. Should this happen, it could leave him without a way to make a living.

A medical professional who holds a license should strongly consider speaking with an attorney to evaluate his options should he get accused of drunk driving. An effective defense strategy may be important to protecting a doctor’s ability to practice medicine and provide for himself and his family.

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