Schedule Your Free Consultation

PLEASE NOTE: To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients and prospective clients the ability to meet with us in person, via telephone or through video conferencing. Please call our office to discuss your options

Tipping The Scales Of
Justice In Your Favor

License suspensions for drunk driving are serious

| Feb 8, 2019 | Drunk Driving Charges |

As people in New City, New York, and the surrounding communities probably know just from experience, drunk driving charges can lead to serious consequences.

Even for a first-time offense with no special circumstances, they can theoretically land a person in jail, and a conviction will require mean a person has to devote time, and money, to probation and related requirements, such as alcohol counseling.

One of the things residents of New York probably fear the most about a drunk driving conviction is the mandatory license suspension, as many people need to be able to drive in order to get to work, school or other important activities.

Some might describe New York’s license suspension scheme for alcohol-related offenses to be more severe than what one might find in other states. For instance, the basic license suspension, for a first-time offender who measured .08 blood alcohol content, is a six-month revocation. Even one aggravating circumstance can mean an automatic one-year revocation at a minimum.

Moreover, someone may wind up with a license suspension even if they take a blood or breath test and have a result below .08. For instance, a charge of driving while ability impaired, or DWAI, includes a 90 day suspension of one’s license. A person can be accused of a DWAI if their BAC is at or above .05 and, according to the arresting officer, they show other signs of not being able to drive a vehicle safely.

It may be essential to a person’s livelihood and well-being to defend against a license suspension after a drunk driving charge. An experienced defense attorney can help a person explore his or her options.

Archives

FindLaw Network