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Symptoms of computer vision syndrome

| Aug 28, 2017 | Workers' Compensation |

The average American worker may spend up to seven hours a day looking at a computer. This can lead to computer vision syndrome that features symptoms such as eye strain, headaches and neck pain. In most cases, these will go away once an individual stops looking at a computer or other screen. However, some New York workers will experience long-term symptoms that may have an impact on their quality of life.

In most cases, CVS can be diagnosed as part of an eye exam. Those who have this condition may be advised to wear glasses or contact lenses that have tints or coatings on them to improve their vision. It may also be a good idea to ensure that a computer is 20 to 28 inches away from a person’s eye to reduce the odds of eye or other discomfort.

While using a computer, a person’s feet should be resting properly on the floor. It may also be prudent to close the blinds or use an anitglare screen to reduce the amount of light a computer or phone screen produces. Regular blinking as well as regular breaks may also reduce the impact of screen time on a person’s eyes. Ideally, a person will take a 15-minute break for every two hours of screen time.

Those who have experienced a workplace injury may be entitled to workers’ compensation benefits on a temporary or permanent basis. This may be true regardless of why or how the injury occurred. An injured worker must first report the incident to the employer. An attorney can often be of assistance throughout the process.

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