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Getting another diagnosis

| May 15, 2017 | Medical Malpractice |

New York residents who believe that they have received an incorrect initial medical diagnosis may want to consider obtaining a virtual second opinion. Without needing to go into a larger city or travel around the country, patients can contact specialists and subspecialists in order to obtain an additional diagnosis.

It is estimated that each year 12 million people who receive outpatient care in the United States are victims of diagnostic errors. Such errors can result in delayed treatment, treatment for the wrong medical conditions as well as negative effects on the quality of life and financial security of the patients, employers and family members who serve as caregivers. These results account for a part of the $750 billion that is wasted on inefficient and unnecessary health services.

While obtaining a second medical opinion is an option that has always been available, it can be difficult for patients, their employers and health insurers to know who to contact. As a result, virtual care coordination services that provide second medical opinions have been increasingly used for the benefit of patients, local providers and insurers.

Insurance companies and employers both have a stake in ensuring better outcomes at reduced costs and making sure that employees are able to return to work. The second-opinion services are being included in employee benefit packages. Providers of health insurance are also becoming partners with the companies that offer the services.

An erroneous diagnosis can turn out to be medical malpractice if it results in a worsened medical condition. An attorney representing a patient who has been harmed in such a manner will need to demonstrate that the error constituted a failure of the practitioner to exhibit the required standard of care.

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