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Tipping The Scales Of
Justice In Your Favor

Pomona man allegedly bribed police to obtain, sell gun licenses

| May 4, 2016 | Criminal Defense |

There are many reasons a person may be legally barred from purchasing a firearm in New York. While it may not seem fair to some New City residents, it is the law. However, one man has allegedly tried to circumvent those laws through bribery.

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, a Pomona man allegedly ran a scheme in which he would pay bribes to obtain firearms licenses from the New York Police Department. He would then sell the licenses to those who otherwise couldn’t legally purchase them. He allegedly sold the licenses for as much as $18,000 each.

Prosecutors claim that the man spent nearly every day at the NYPD. When he had no more contacts for his scheme, he offered a License Division officer $6,000 per gun license. The prosecution claims the man even bragged that he had obtained 150 gun licenses this way through his connections with the NYPD.

The man was later arrested and charged with bribery. News reports state that the arrest is part of an ongoing probe of corruption within the NYPD.

Bribery is just one of many types of white collar crimes. These crimes are generally financial in nature. One can be charged with bribery if they offer a government employee something of value in exchange for something else, such as goods or a favor. Bribery can result in significant penalties for those convicted of it. Therefore, those charged with bribery should take all the steps necessary to defend themselves in court so they can clear their name.

Source: New City Patch, “Rockland Man Charged with Bribery Over NYPD-Issued Gun Licenses,” Lanning Taliaferro, April 19, 2016

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