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Tipping The Scales Of
Justice In Your Favor

Those accused of drug offenses deserve a strong defense

| Jan 9, 2015 | Drug Charges |

Being charged with a drug crime in New York should not be taken lightly. Whether the charges are for mere possession of a small quantity of drugs or for more serious crimes such as drug manufacturing and trafficking, a conviction for a drug crime can have lifelong consequences in the form of a permanent criminal record.

Illegal drugs can include prohibited substances such as cocaine, heroin, marijuana, crack cocaine or illegally obtained prescription drugs or steroids. Some drug crimes carry with them heavy penalties, including fines and incarceration. But even convictions on some lesser drug charges can still result in undesirable outcomes to those accused. In fact, even the mere accusations of drug crimes can jeopardize a person’s reputation and his or her standing in the community. If you are accused of crimes involving these drugs, it is important to seek legal help.

At Braunfotel & Frendel, we aim to achieve fair outcomes in our clients’ cases. We have represented many clients in alternative courts such as drug courts and understand the procedures that they use. Our firm strives to ensure that our clients feel they are getting the attention they deserve, yet we also have the resources necessary to represent those charged with serious crimes.

No one facing drug offenses should have to go through the legal process alone. Fortunately, New City criminal defense attorneys are available to help those accused of drug crimes build a solid defense. Whether it is challenging the evidence presented by the prosecution or offering an alibi or other defense, having the help of an attorney could be the key between a “guilty” and “not guilty” verdict.

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