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New York man drives drunk to turn himself in to police

| Dec 13, 2013 | Drunk Driving |

An upstate New York man has been charged with aggravated DWI and criminal contempt after he drove 30 miles to turn himself in to state troopers on other charges. After being charged, he was arraigned and released on bail.

On Dec. 2, the 42-year-old man from Pattersonville agreed to turn himself in to authorities for violation of an order of protection at the state police barracks in Brunswick, according to state police. The man then drove the 30 miles from western Schenectady County to Brunswick in a highly intoxicated state. His blood alcohol content was tested at 0.23 percent; the legal limit in New York is 0.08 percent.

Serious drunk driving charges coupled with other criminal offenses are eligible for criminal penalties that can include a period of incarceration and monetary fines. Those charged with these offenses can have their driving privileges restricted through license suspension or limitations placed upon when and where they may drive, with more serious and repeat offenders losing the privilege altogether when their license to drive is revoked.

Many suspected drunk drivers also face the prospect of having personal freedoms restricted. Some may be prohibited from frequenting social establishments and other venues where alcohol is sold and served. Others may be required to purchase and install an ignition interlock device on vehicles they drive to lessen the chance they will consume alcohol and then get behind the wheel.

A persons’ DUI and criminal history will carry substantial weight with courts when determining the appropriate sentence for the charged offenses. Courts will also consider the impact the drunk driving event had on the public and the documents in the court record. A defense attorney might be able to provide mitigating evidence not otherwise in the court record and negotiate for resolution of the charges without going to trial.

Source: CBS Connecticut, “Troopers: New York Man Drove Drunk To Turn Himself In”, December 05, 2013

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